Designing a Great “Close My Account” Experience

When a user goes to close their account, how easy do you make it on them? The folks at Harvest have nailed this user experience.

From settings, when I click the “Cancel Account” button I’m taken here:

First of all, that illustration is adorable, very personable, and unique. It’s refreshing to see illustrations that are way outside the current popular trend of big bodies with tiny heads:

The next thing that caught my eye was the “Put Account on Hold” option. How cool is that! I’ve never seen an app do that. I’d love to know what percentage of people choose that option instead of closing their account.

I decided to close the account anyway. The next screen I’m presented with is this one:

It makes sense that they’d want to use this as an opportunity to gather feedback. I like that they don’t ask a bunch of questions and I like that this portion is optional.

When I click “Close Account”, I’m taken to:

Another really personable illustration accompanied by some really friendly copy and even a list of the team members—which I thought was a nice touch.

Most companies would stop right there, but not Harvest. Check out the email I received immediately after closing my account:

Hot dang! They went above and beyond by auto-sending me a downloadable backup of my account data.

I applaud the team at Harvest for going the extra mile, especially when someone is on the way out the door. Now that is the right way to close an account

What other examples have you seen? Hit me up at its@davemart.in. I’d love to hear your examples

What can Cookbooks Teach Us About Design Systems?

I love to eat (nom nom). 🤗 Cooking is one of my favorite pastimes outside of work.

If I were to break down where I spend my time as it relates to cooking, It would probably look like this:

  • 5% Education – Learning new skills/Expanding my knowledge of food and cooking techniques
  • 5% Discovery – Finding new recipes/Exploration/Experimentation
  • 90% Execution – Cooking dishes that I’m already familiar with

That said, I’ve been cooking for a couple of decades. In that sense have a lot of experience. The percentage breakdown may vary drastically for those just getting into cooking.

Regardless, most cookbooks tend to do a pretty good job of catering to all three of these functions.

Education

Generally towards the beginning of a cookbook you’ll find a section that focuses on education, on how to perform particular skills. Here’s an example from The 4 Hour Chef for how to chop using your knuckle:

Everything on this page is about teaching and education.

Discovery & Execution

The rest of the cookbook (the large majority of pages) are then filled with individual recipes. Here’s another example from The 4 Hour Chef:

If I add some highlights, it’s easier to how each recipe is broken down into two functions:

  1. Discovery in purple
  2. Execution in orange

How does this relate to design systems?

I see a strong connection between how I spend my time cooking and how I spend my time designing/developing. When I’m designing a new feature, typically about 90% of my time is spent executing—or working with pre-existing components that I’m already familiar with. 10% of my time is then split between either education or discovery around new ways to solve a particular problem.

When creating a design system

It may be worth thinking about:

  • Who is the target user of your design system?
    • People who are just getting ramped up?
    • People who understand your principles, process, styles, and components intimately?
    • Or some sort of cross between the two?
  • With that in mind, what percentage of your documentation and your energy is dedicated to:
    • Education
    • Discovery
    • Execution
  • Does that breakout (the % you focus on education, discovery, and execution) match your target user?

Ways for Designers to Learn JavaScript

If you’re a designer who’s wanted to learn JS, but has yet to make the commitment, here are a few handy resources to get you started:

Free

Paid

Wes Bos is having a Black Friday sale right now with 50% off all of his courses. If you’re in the market for something a bit more advanced, I’d highly recommend:

Making it easy for users to proactively give you feedback

How easy is it for the users of your app to submit bug reports, or to offer up a suggestions? As someone who has a long history with tech, it’s relatively easy for me to grab a screenshot, or create an animated gif to pass along, but do all of your users find it this easy?

This week we’ll look at a couple of ways to make it easy for users to give you feedback at just the right time.

Make it easy for users to show you what they’re seeing

Here’s a really neat way that Google Domains allows you to send feedback within their app.

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The key ingredient to successful trigger emails

Back in the day when I worked at WordPress.com we were trying to figure out how to activate more users. Lot’s of people would sign up for an account, use it during that first session and then never come back.

The goal was to figure out how we could bring more people back. Naturally, one of the first things we looked at was email triggers. In the process of doing that we stumbled across something interesting that I’ll highlight below.

The first thing I did was simply to pull up my personal Gmail account. I typed the following into the search bar, “from:(twitter.com) twitter.com” and here’s what I saw:

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Duolingo’s Dynamic Homepage

This week I thought I’d highlight something interesting that I noticed on Duolingo’s homepage—something that I’ve actually never seen before.

The vast majority of companies treat their homepage like a static resource. That means that no matter who you are and no matter which stage of the user lifecycle you’re in, you’ll see the exact same page.

Duolingo does something different. Check it out: Here’s what their homepage looks like when you go there for the first time:

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Content Gating Example Code (HTML, CSS, JS)

Last week we looked at the best implementation that I’ve ever seen of content gating on the First Round Capital blog.

This week I’d like to take a stab at reproducing that example in simple HTML, CSS, and Javascript. The goal for this week is to give you a head start should you decide to ever experiment with gating on your blog.

Let’s dive right into the code.

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Let’s Talk About Content Gating

Ewww… Right? At least the way most people implement it. We’ll start by looking at the Wall Street Journal.

Let’s say you’re on Twitter, and a friend shares a WSJ link with you, you click it, read like 1-2 paragraphs and then you hit this bad boy:

Yuck! What a terrible experience.

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Test Every Assumption

Let’s say I’m at work and we’re discussing a potential change that we’re thinking about making to our product (or even the marketing site). If the phrase “best practice” or “common knowledge” get’s tossed out, a little red flag always pops up in my head.

“common knowledge” is just an unproven assumption

It’s a mirage I tell you!

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Complete Novice to Full-time Product Designer in 1-2 Years

In this post, I’ll talk about the path that I would take to go from a complete novice, to a full-time product designer—all within a year or two—and land a job that pays at least $90,000/yr.

A few disclaimers:

  1. This isn’t a life hack article. Below, you won’t find a list of hacks, but a list of real work that must commit to.
  2. I’m not trying to sell you anything. This post is not the intro to some paid course that I’m trying to up-sell you on. I don’t want/need anything from you in return. (That said, if you do end up becoming a product designer, I’d love to hear your story).
  3. The path outlined below offers the fastest way (that I know of), for anyone to change careers, and become a product designer. Follow these steps, and you’ll save a great deal of time, and money with your transition.
  4. This is obviously not the only path, but this is the path I would take if I were starting over from scratch, with zero experience as a designer.
  5. Paying for education to become a product designer is NEVER something that I’d recommend. This statement will likely offend some (especially those who have paid for design school), or those who sell expensive design courses, but please trust me when I say that you do not need a degree to become a product designer. We’ll talk about this in more detail below.

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